Plant Pathology

USDA undersecretary encounters research for specialty crops at Prosser

A U.S. Department of Agriculture visit shares grant-funded advances in smart technology, virus-free plants, biotic and abiotic stresses, and training the next-generation workforce.

WSDA and USDA Prosser visit 2024

New from Extension: Invasive tree killers; tradeoffs of harvesting straw; organic blueberries; reducing fire risks

New guide help Northwest communities prepare for an damaging insect, and let wheat farmers calculate tradeoffs of cutting straw.

Emerald ash borer

Partner-funded WSU Plant Growth Facility is paid off, paying forward

Now paid off, WSU’s expanded Plant Growth facility enables faster, more efficient breeding and more competitive new wheat varieties.

Japan millers tour PGF

Crop-defending scientist Lindsey du Toit leads WSU Plant Pathology Dept.

Lindsey du Toit is the first woman to lead WSU Plant Pathology as full, regular chair.

Lindsey du Toit portrait

Asia-Pacific partners get look at WSU research for Skagit Valley’s exported specialty crops

Sharing research that helps Washington’s Skagit Valley specialty-crop producers supply the world, scientists at WSU’s Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center gave members of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) an in-field look at current projects on soil-biodegradable plastic mulch, soil health, and disease defense. Visiting Mount Vernon on Friday, Aug. 4, five APEC-member secretaries or […]

Lisa DeVetter hosts the APEC tour

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture helps break ground for new USDA-ARS Plant Sciences Building

Officials, legislators, and university leaders broke ground for the new USDA-ARS Plant Sciences Building on the Pullman campus

USDA-ARS Plant Sciences Building Groundbreaking

WSU sentinel plantings to guard against invasive pests, diseases at Washington ports

TACOMA, Wash.—Aiming to catch and identify invasive pests and diseases before they impact Washington farms and forests, scientists at Washington State University will plant trees and shrubs as sentinels at the Port of Tacoma. Funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service’s Office of International Programs and drawing on the involvement of community scientists, […]

Tacoma port

Engineers, plant scientists decoding electrochemical signals of soil health

Seeking new tools to improve soil health, scientists at Washington State University are studying electric signals that bounce between plants and the underworld community of microbes that sustains them. This spring, a cross-disciplinary team of WSU engineers and crop scientists will sink electrodes into Washington wheat fields, as well as in soil-filled containers in the […]

Checking on electrochemical cells