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Students aiming to attend national Farm Bureau conference

By Sarah Appel, CAHNRS Academic Programs

For the next generation of farmers and ranchers now studying at WSU, opportunities to network with professional industry partners come in many forms. One of those opportunities is the 2019 National Farm Bureau FUSION Conference this March in Milwaukee.

6 young women pose with novelty sticks, some with phrases like 'Howdy' on them, some with cowboy hats or other western items.
Members of the WSU Young Farmer and Rancher’s club at their recent swing dance fund raiser.

Four WSU Young Farmer and Rancher (YF&R) members will attend the conference with other young leaders from across the nation involved in Promotion & Education and Women’s Leadership as well as Young Farmers and Ranchers. The conference focusses on four areas: consumer outreach, member value advocacy, outreach and education, and leadership development.

Attendees will participate in workshops and sessions, while also networking with industry partners and other young professionals. The hope is to learn, share and work together to build a stronger Farm Bureau and give participants new knowledge and energy to take back to their farms and hometowns.

The cost of attendance is roughly $900 per person including registration, hotel, and travel costs. Those going from WSU have worked extremely hard to raise funds by visiting local Farm Bureaus, sending out letters, hosting a Swing Dance at Ensminger Pavilion, and more. People across the state have been supportive of the group and the dance was a great success, bringing in about $350. People danced, socialized, and had a great time supporting their classmates and friends.

If you’re interested in donating, please contact WSU YF&R President, Hallie Galbreath. The group has a WSU Young Farmers and Ranchers Facebook page, where anyone can learn more about the club. More on Young Farmers and Ranchers and Washington Farm Bureau, is available at https://wsfb.com/.

CAHNRS Talk Tuesday: Jordan Hummel

Each week, we showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Jordan Hummel, a sophomore from Yelm, Wash.Graphic of student's interests with a formal portrait photo.

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Agricultural Education.

Favorite Show/Movie:

Beauty and the Beast (2017)

Favorite Cougar Tradition:

My favorite Cougar tradition is our school spirit! One of my favorite parts about being back home or travelling is wearing Coug gear, and having people say “GO COUGS!” Whether it’s across the state or across the country, there is always at least one fellow Coug ready to show-off our Wazzu spirit. It’s amazing to see not only how wide the WSU community is, but also how much school spirit we have, both as alumni and current students. And WSU spirit at Cougar sporting events? Don’t even get me started!

Favorite CAHNRS Commodity:

My favorite CAHNRS commodity is definitely Ferdinand’s ice cream! While there are countless dairy choices to choose from, ice cream is by far the best product that has ever come across the WSU campus. My favorite flavor would have to be Cookie Dough, but I can’t go wrong with any of their flavors! Whenever friends or family come into town, even on the coldest day in the dead of winter, it’s always a staple to go grab some ice cream.

Why be a CAHNRS Coug?

I originally chose CAHNRS after I heard about the outstanding Agricultural Education major. As I progressed through my freshman year, however, I continued to choose CAHNRS because of all the amazing people I shared classes with. I found people who shared my interests in both agriculture and educating people about the industry, people who had similar upbringings on a ranch, and most importantly, people who I could call my family. As a freshman recently released on the WSU campus, it is easy to get lost in the crowd. CAHNRS provided me with people that I not only found common interests with, but people who genuinely care about me and my passions. The people I’ve met and the friends I’ve made have all made WSU feel less like a community and more like a home.

Best Student Experience:

My favorite student experience was taking Animal Science 101. Martin Maquivar was a phenomenal professor who made learning interactive and fun, even if some of the content was information I already knew. Being able to take a class where I can tie in my background of raising beef cattle was such a fun experience and being able to meet people who also grew up raising livestock helped me learn so much more about different species! Upon coming to college, I expected to enjoy my classes, but this course greatly surpassed all my expectations.

CAHNRS Taught Me:

Through my classes and Agriculture Education Club, I have had the opportunities to meet future and current Agricultural teachers, as well as people involved with the agricultural industry, who I can share experiences with and ask questions. They have been incredible sources of both personal and professional development. The thought of going out into the “real-world” to teach can be a very overwhelming reality. But the knowledge that I have a network of people who are willing to support me during those first few years has added a sense of relief. I know that I will have incredible people backing me up wherever I go all thanks to CAHNRS!

Fresh from Extension: Tools, defenses and new ideas for farmers and growers

A field of wheat, with a farm in the background.
New guides from Extension publications help growers diversify dryland farms, choose the right equipment, and much more.

WSU Extension scientists work with Northwest farmers and communities, building new knowledge for resilient farms and a healthy environment.

Extension faculty are also authors, who every month share the results of their work through peer-reviewed online publications. Newly published WSU Extension guides include:

You can find the latest publications at the WSU Extension Online Bookstore.

Find the newest monthly listings here.

 

Oilseed workshops help farmers establish vigorous crop

Two growers stand, visiting with scientist holding a plant
Ian Burke, WOCS director, speaks with growers at 2019 oilseed workshops in Washington state.

More than 250 growers and industry professionals saw Washington State University oilseed research in action firsthand last month, at annual WSU-based Washington Oilseed Cropping Systems workshops.

Held at Wilbur and Clarkston, Wash., this year’s workshops focused on helping farmers establish strong stands, through live plant diagnostics, variety selection tips, pollinator stewardship, seeding equipment manufacturer updates, marketing strategies, and more

“The WOCS program has been instrumental getting the entire oilseed supply chain involved in research and outreach,” said Nathan Rosenau of Columbia Grain. “Without them, the oilseed industry in Washington state would be like a marathon runner missing a shoe—it just doesn’t work.”

“It was a great workshop with a lot of variety,” added Josh Sherwood, a Wilbur farmer and member of the Wilbur workshop planning committee. “Whether you’ve never grown canola, or have for 30 years, there was a little bit of everything for everyone.”

Exploring the theme of stand establishment—attaining maximum, uniform, and vigorous seed germination and emergence— both general and breakout sessions addressed that challenge. Topics included diagnosing residual herbicide injury on live canola plants, plant growth regulators, fertility management, and more. Seed company representatives also shared the newest canola varieties.

“It was really great to learn more about winter canola, how people are doing things in this area, and especially about stand establishment,” said Simon Fordyce, a first-time attendee from Montana State University.

Each workshop featured an opening session with a panel of growers relating their experiences with stand establishment. One of those growers, Minot, N.D., farmer Pat Murphy, is the recently elected president of the U.S. Canola Association.

“I was impressed by the workshops and the attendance,” said Murphy. “I haven’t seen a group of growers that enthusiastic for a long time.”

“I’ve been going to meetings for over 20 years and this is no doubt one of the best meetings I’ve been to,” added Stacey Lorentz, a canola industry representative who took part in the Clarkston workshop. “It was very informative, and I was really impressed.”

“The workshops, no matter the theme, have been a source of discussion in a huge way,” said Rosenau. “I’ve never heard people talk about a single specialty crop as much as I have the weeks and months following the workshops.”

Presentations will be posted on the WOCS website as they become available.

Learn more about WOCS here.

Scientist stands at a table covered with small plants, speaking as a circle of growers listen.

 

CAHNRS Talk Tuesday: Kayla Beechinor

Each week, we showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Kayla Beechinor, a junior from Walla Walla, Wash.Graphic of student's interests with a formal portrait photo.

What are you studying?

I’m double-majoring in Agricultural Biotechnology and Field Crop Management.

Favorite Show/Movie:

The Office

Favorite Cougar Tradition:

The spirit that WSU students have is unmatched! You can travel anywhere in the world and the Cougar family and spirit will be present. One of my favorite memories is traveling to Hawaii for an internship and getting a “Go Cougs!” from someone in the airport right after I landed. It made the experience even better knowing that there is a full line of alumni supporting me wherever I go. When you become a Cougar, you instantly join a community that is full of support and enormous spirit!

Favorite CAHNRS Commodity:

CAHNRS has multiple commodities that I love, but my favorite would have to be the Huckleberry Ripple or Cougar Tracks ice cream! Ferdinand’s ice-cream is located right next to a lot of CAHNRS classes, so it is easy to go grab and eat while studying with groups. You know that when you enjoy this incredible treat, you are eating some of the best ice-cream in the nation that’s made by CAHNRS Cougs!

Why be a CAHNRS Coug?

Being a CAHNRS Coug means that I can learn within an environment that supports my education, goals, and dreams. CAHNRS awards around $735,000 each year in scholarships and gives students multiple resources to find scholarships. With their support, I have been able to have my tuition paid for each year at WSU! The school also has programs, like the Ignite Program, which allowed me to make money while doing research as a freshman. Money can be a huge stress factor for students, but thanks to CAHNRS, I have the monetary freedom to focus on my studies!

Best Student Experience:

One of my best experiences was joining the Ignite Undergraduate Research Program through CAHNRS. This allowed me to start research through the Spring Wheat Breeding Program starting my freshman year of college. I have now been working there for three years and won an award for my research after I presented at SURCA, WSU’s undergraduate research fair. I am extremely thankful that I have had this opportunity because I have been able to apply what I learn in class, work with my professors, and prepare for my future in Plant Breeding.

CAHNRS Taught Me:

CAHNRS has prepared me for my future through giving me multiple opportunities to network. I have been able to help with field days at WSU with the wheat breeding program. This resulted in connections and getting an internship outside of WSU! I have also been able to network with students around the country by attending Agriculture Future of America Leaders Conference. The others clubs I am involved in such as The International Development Club and WSU Young Farmers and Ranchers Club have also offered multiple networking opportunities.

CAHNRS students learn in Windy City

Four CAHNRS students attended the 2019 Agriculture Future of America (AFA) Food Institute in Chicago, Ill. from Jan. 27-29. Alongside 75 college students from across the country, attendees learned all about food production: from the moment crops leave the farm and processing to R&D and marketing to packaging and everything in between. As future agricultural professionals, these students are preparing to take on the challenges ahead. To learn more about AFA and the Food Institute, visit http://www.agfuture.org.

Allan and Van Weerdhuizen stand next to a giant novelty milkshake, nearly as tall as they are.
WSU student and AFA Student Advisory Team member, Colm Allan, and WSU student, Elea Van Weerdhuizen.
Three WSU students pose in front of a geometric piece of art.
WSU Students: (Left to right) Macy Hagler, Luke Wolfisberg, and Elea Van Weerdhuizen

CAHNRS Talk Tuesday: Jillian Nordness

Each week, we showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Jillian Nordness, a senior from Kirkland, Wash.Graphic of student's interests with a formal portrait photo.

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Food ScienceFermentation Science.

Favorite Show/Movie:

Bob’s Burgers

Favorite Cougar Tradition:

I started going to Cougar football games in high school with my older sister, who was a WSU student at the time. Watching the Cougs play in Martin Stadium and being a part of such a dedicated and excited student section inspired my love of Cougar football at a very young age. That love has only grown since moving to Pullman and becoming a Coug myself. Even after I graduate and become an alumnus, I will definitely make it back to Pullman for football season!

Favorite CAHNRS Commodity:

Hands down, one of the best products made within CAHNRS is Ferdinand’s Ice Cream, especially the Huckleberry Ripple. As a food science major, I love to support Ferdinand’s. It’s a student-made product that has employed many of my friends. It’s an incredible way to not only support the people that I study with, but to also enjoy a delicious treat as well!

Why be a CAHNRS Coug?

One of the many reasons I chose CAHNRS is because of the endless opportunities the college provides to its students. Personally, I have been able to do a paid undergraduate research internship, act as a student ambassador for the School of Food Science, and be a representative on the CAHNRS Student Senate. All these activities have helped to shape me as both a student and as a person. Being a CAHNRS Coug means always looking for new opportunities to grow and develop as a student and take on new challenges that will encourage improvement!

Best Student Experience:

This past summer, I completed a 10-week internship with Ecolab as an Account Manager Intern. It was an incredibly valuable experience with tons of hands-on experience in the food industry. I had a lot of fun learning, travelling, applying my knowledge of food science, and building relationships with many different people in the industry! This was a great opportunity to get an inside look into a possible future career that I wouldn’t have had without CAHNRS.

CAHNRS Taught Me:

CAHNRS has provided me with many opportunities to grow and develop my leadership skills, something that will benefit me greatly upon graduating this Spring. Being a part of the Ambassador team and being a CAHNRS Senate Representative for the Food Science club has allowed me to take on more responsibility within my college and major and to share my knowledge and passion with others. Being a leader isn’t just about knowing the answers and telling people what to do, it’s about sharing knowledge with others in order to guide and inspire them.

 

CAHNRS Talk Tuesday: Chris West

Each week, we showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Chris West, a junior from Plano, TexasGraphic of student's interests with a formal portrait photo..

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Viticulture and Enology.

Favorite Show/Movie:

Star Wars

Favorite Cougar Tradition:

Nothing beats drinking a pint every Friday afternoon at the Coug with my mates! In the rush of college, whether it be papers, exams, projects, or many else, it is easy to forget to take a few minutes and just enjoy life. These Friday afternoons are times to do just that: breathe and enjoy the day. This time to relax and appreciate the afternoon with my friends is something I look forward to everyday.

Favorite CAHNRS Commodity:

Wine and cheese! Is there a better pair? Especially when you know where and how the wine is made, right here in the Palouse! As someone who has first-hand experience making wine, I know how to appreciate someone else’s hard work and effort put in to make the drink. And cheese is indisputably the best food to pair with a great wine.

Why be a CAHNRS Coug?

Being a CAHNRS Coug provides a fantastic universal sense of comradery, friendship, leadership, and the chance to pass on wisdom. I hope to pass on the knowledge I have gained through my successes, as well as my failures, to a new generation of Cougs. Just as someone showed me the ropes of college, I hope to teach younger students what it really means to be a CAHNRS Coug.

Best Student Experience:

Being given the chance to make wine while studying at WSU has been an incredible opportunity and experience. Getting the chance to make my own wine, as well as Merry’s wine at Merry Cellars, is something I wouldn’t give up. Outside of work and the classroom, watching the Cougs beat Stanford during last year’s Dad’s Weekend, with my dad by my side, was an experience I’ll never forget! From good wine to great football, WSU has it all!

CAHNRS Taught Me:

CAHNRS taught me the very broad spectrum of wine and winemaking. When the variety of fruit and other avenues sparked my interest in viticulture and enology, the CAHNRS department opened all kinds of doors for me. From classes to internships to work opportunities, CAHNRS has provided countless opportunities for growth, learning and enjoyment.

 

CAHNRS Talk Tuesday: Gracie Dickerson

Each week, we showcase one of our CAHNRS Ambassadors, a student leadership organization that encourages students to pursue higher education and serves as a liaison between the college and the greater community. This week, we’re featuring Gracie Dickerson, a junior from St. John, Wash.Graphic of student's interests with a formal portrait photo.

What are you studying?

I’m majoring in Agricultural and Food Business Economics.

Favorite Show/Movie:

The Office

Favorite Cougar Tradition:

Tailgating for home football games. Is there anything better than waking up Saturday morning, seeing crimson and gray flood the parking lots of Pullman, and the comfort of knowing everyone is there to cheer on the Cougs? At tailgates, I love the camaraderie and togetherness, the feeling that win-or-lose, we are all there to support one team, one college, and one big family. To me, that is when Coug spirit is on full display.

Favorite CAHNRS Commodity:

Cougar Tracks Ice Cream. Vanilla ice cream, fudge swirl, and peanut butter cups? The only thing that could make this ice cream better is if it were made with milk from the university’s own student run dairy farm. Oh wait- it is! It’s a chance to enjoy a delicious treat while supporting the very people I go to class with!

Why be a CAHNRS Coug?

The worldwide connections. Being a CAHNRS Coug means connection. Sharing a passion for improving quality of life, enhancing ecological and environmental systems, and advancing agricultural science connects me with all future and past CAHNRS Cougs. There is a personal network that puts others first and wants success for one another. And there is a professional network that loves hiring CAHNRS Cougs worldwide in a variety of industries. Being a CAHNRS Coug means you have a system of students, faculty, and alumni that connect you with your dreams.

Best Student Experience:

During my freshman year at WSU, I was chosen to be a part of an undergraduate research program called Ignite. Ignite opened the door for me to partake in undergraduate research related to my major. My research was in bovine nutrition and better prepared me to serve the inland northwest agricultural sector by helping producers increase their production and efficiency in a sustainable, cost-effective manner. I learned lab skills and data collection and improved my ability to relate information to both producers and people in academia. This position with Ignite led to another CAHNRS research position working with bovine genetics and agricultural economics. Both experiences have prepared me for a career following my passion and serving the local agricultural sector. I highly recommend incoming CAHNRS students to get involved with research.

CAHNRS Taught Me:

Washington State University has pushed me to personally and professionally prepare myself for a career in agriculture. As a CAHNRS student, I interact with knowledgeable professors and industry professionals, which helps me apply my university education to real-world situations. It is not all about grades and test scores. I appreciate how CAHNRS recognizes the need to expand skills that employers seek, like communication and problem-solving capabilities. CAHNRS focuses on generating well-rounded students that will improve the human, natural, and agricultural domains.

Extension podcaster brings grazing, conservation together on ‘Art of Range’

Logo of the Art of Range podcast, showing an illustration of range crops and radio waves.Helping maintain and preserve rangelands and inform the ranchers and professionals who manage them, Tip Hudson, WSU associate professor of rangeland and livestock management and director of Kittitas County Extension, recently launched a new podcast, “Art of Range.”

Seeking to provide education through conversation with national experts on managing and conserving rangelands—the grasslands, forest lands and prairies that support grazing—Hudson began the podcast last fall, posting new episodes every two weeks.

“Healthy land, healthy animals, and healthy communities are inextricably linked,” says Hudson. “My goal with this podcast is to help people produce food and fiber on naturally-occurring plant communities in ways that promote sound ecology and economy.”

Profile view of Hudson, out of doors in camo jacket.
Tip Hudson

Interviewing experts such as Ken Tate, Endowed Rangeland Watershed Science Specialist at the University of California-Davis; Fred Provenza, animal behaviorist researcher emeritus at Utah State University; Karen Launchbaugh, Director of the University of Idaho Rangeland Center; and Jack Southworth, award-winning rancher in eastern Oregon, Hudson explores the interplay of animals and environment, invasive grass management, ranch resiliency, grazing philosophies, and challenges to public lands grazing.

“Range management is both art and science,” Hudson states. “Sustainable, rangeland-based ranching is important to society as one of our only methods of food and fiber production that relies on native or naturalized ecosystems with minimal costs from petroleum-based fuels and products.”

Hudson’s podcast is produced by Washington State University Extension in cooperation with the Society for Range Management.

  • The Art of Range podcast is available through iTunes and Stitcher. Learn more and join the conversation at the Art of Range website.