Skip to main content Skip to navigation

New from Extension: Better cider orchards, flood solutions, meat quality

Posted by struscott | March 11, 2019

Rainbow over a modern apple orchard.WSU Extension scientists work with Washington farmers, industries, and communities, building new knowledge for a stronger economy, better practices and healthier lives.

Extension faculty are also authors, who every month share the results of their work through peer-reviewed online publications. Newly published WSU Extension guides include:

  • Home Garden and Lawn Fertilizer Calculator (FS324E), part of the Home Garden Series. This guide helps gardeners calculate how much conventional or organic fertilizer to use on gardens, lawns, single plants and short rows; written by WSU Extension Soil Scientist Emeritus Craig Cogger.
  • WSU Carcass Calculator App (FS317E), an easy-to-use guide to calculating yields, grade, and cutability for beef, lamb and pork, by Animal Science faculty members Sarah M. Smith and Jan Busboom, and former Animal Sciences graduate student, now Extension educator Natasha Moffit-Hemmer.
  • A Community-based Response to Flooding (PNW700). Part of the Farmer-to-Farmer Case Study Series, this publication looks at the experience of Jay Gordon, Elma, Wash., dairy farmer and policy director for the Washington State Dairy Federation. After recent frequent and severe flooding events, Gordon has been working in his community to reduce flooding in his watershed. Written by Georgine Yorgey, associate director of WSU’s Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources; CSANR Director Chad Kruger; and CSANR Research Associate Sonia Hall.
  • Establishing a Cider Apple Orchard for Mechanized Management (EM117E). This guide helps commercial cider apple growers with management options to reduce the need for labor, establishing a fruit wall for mechanized management that optimizes yield and quality. Written by Travis Alexander, postdoctoral researcher in horticulture at WSU’s Northwestern Washington Research and Extension Center; NWREC Technical Assistants Ed Scheenstra and Jacky King; Stefano Musacchi, Endowed Chair of Tree Fruit Physiology and Management; and WSU Horticulture Prof. and Vegetable Extension Specialist Carol Miles.