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Latest from Extension: Guides on giant hornet, cheatgrass controls, cover crops, fruit canning

Posted by struscott | September 3, 2020

In the latest free guides from WSU Extension, Northwest scientists share new information about the invasive Asian giant hornet, feedstock crops, cheatgrass controls, financial tools to manage forest lands, and more.

New and revised publications from WSU Extension include:

A large Asian giant hornet biting a honey bee.The Asian Giant Hornet — What the Public and Beekeepers Need to Know (FS347E). The invasive Asian giant hornet poses a significant threat to honey bees, public health, and the environment: Beekeepers and the public can learn about the hornet’s life cycle, avoidance, first aid, and more; by Sue Cobey, Tim Lawrence, and Mike Jensen.

Utilizing Buckwheat and Sudangrass Cover Crops as Feedstock in Aerated, Static Compost Piles (B71E). Learn about a new technique to grow and use buckwheat and sudangrass as composting feedstock; by Stephen Bramwell, Douglas Collins, and Andy Bary.

Integrated Management of Downy Brome in Winter Wheat (PNW668). Learn about integrated weed management strategies to control downy brome, also known as cheatgrass—a major weed management problem in winter wheat; by Drew Lyon, Andy Hulting, Judit Barroso, and Joan Campbell.

Financial Analysis Principles and Applications for Private Forest Lands (EM030E). Determining the value of timbered property, as well as the best ways to manage it can be complicated. This manual provides examples, explanations, and tools to make the process understandable and successful; by Kevin Zobrist.

Composite image of different canning fruitsGuardado de frutas en conserva (Canning Fruits) (PNW199S). Esta publicación explica cómo garantizar tanto la seguridad como la calidad de las frutas frescas guardadas en conserva. Spanish language version of the Extension publication on ensuring safety and quality when canning fresh fruits. Covers selecting and preparing equipment; preparing apples, apricots, berries, cherries; and more. By Lizann Powers-Hammond and Val Hillers.