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Celebrating Our “Amber Legacy”

Posted by | September 15, 2009

We recently lost one of the world’s great heroes. Plant scientist and green revolutionary Norman Borlaug died last week at the age of 95. Borlaug, a recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970, worked tirelessly to help ensure that people the world over have enough to eat.

Borlaug worked closely with WSU scientists, including Orville Vogel. In a great tribute to Borlaug, The Spokesman Review’s John Stucke writes, “The two engaged in a sort of competitive camaraderie during the 1950s that launched agriculture’s Green Revolution.” Stucke continues:

“The annual harvests of Eastern Washington are a living legacy to scientist Norman E. Borlaug, who helped develop types of wheat that feed the world.”

Dr. Robert E. Allan (left) with Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr. Norman E. Borlaug, at Spillman Farm, May 1995. Borlaug is credited with fathering the Green Revolution.
Dr. Robert E. Allan (left) with Nobel Peace Prize winner Dr. Norman E. Borlaug, at Spillman Farm, May 1995. Borlaug is credited with fathering the Green Revolution.

Learn more about Borlaug and WSU in The Spokesman Review.