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Bug Off: Structural Pest IPM Facility Opens in Puyallup

Posted by struscott | April 11, 2007

Why would anyone intentionally build a new house with deck posts in contact with soil, improperly installed window flashings, a leaking toilet and attic insulation running right up to ventilation holes?

Corey Chantry, owner of All Seasons Pest Control in Spanaway, points out some of the (deliberate) flaws in the gutter system while conducting a tour of the new facility. Behind him (wearing a tie) is Richard Zack, chair of the WSU Entomology Dept. Chantry is a member of the Washington State Pest Control Association, one of WSU’s partners helped sponsor the facility.
Corey Chantry, owner of All Seasons Pest Control in Spanaway, points out some of the (deliberate) flaws in the gutter system while conducting a tour of the new facility. Behind him (wearing a tie) is Richard Zack, chair of the WSU Department of Entomology. Chantry is a member of the Washington State Pest Control Association, one of WSU’s partners helped sponsor the facility.

The answer is to provide the first hands-on training facility in the western United States for structural pest inspectors where they can actually see the real-world conditions that invite pest infestations.

The new Structural Pest Research and Demonstration Facility opened on April 9, 2007. The facility is located at the Washington State University Puyallup Research and Extension Center at 7612 Pioneer Way East in Puyallup.

While similar facilities have been built in the eastern U.S., this is currently the only facility of its kind in the West.

The 1,152 square foot “house” also features four kinds of exterior siding and four kinds of roofing materials to allow trainees to see what creates pest-friendly conditions in a variety of structural materials.

“People who do structural pest inspections in homes don’t have much opportunity to get hands-on training,” according to Carrie Foss, WSU Extension urban integrated pest management coordinator. “It fills a critical training need by providing a place where they can work with experienced inspectors and learn how to do inspections.”

The training facility will provide lasting benefits for Washington citizens, according to Foss.

a display showing examples of what some of the bugs that this facility might attract can do to a perfectly good piece of wood.
A display showing examples of what some of the bugs that this facility might attract can do to a perfectly good piece of wood.

“Improved training for inspectors will help us all protect our investments in buildings and homes, improve structural safety and reduce impacts on water quality by reducing the need for pesticide use,” she said.

Visit the Structural Pest IPM Facility Web site to learn more. The Structural Pest IPM Facility site has information about upcoming training, licensing and other educational events and resources for inspectors and home owners, including a pest-identification aid.

To learn more about WSU’s graduate program in entomology, please visit the Department of Entomology Web site.

See a video about the M.T. James Entomology Collection at WSU.

Read another article about the new Pest Facility.