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Washington State 4-H Inducts Eight into Hall of Fame

Back row left to right: Richard Bartram, Jo Simpson, Jody Hoffman, Louise Owen. Front row left to right: Audrey Bannon, Cecilia Campbell, Betty Witters.
Back row left to right: Richard Bartram, Jo Simpson, Jody Hoffman, Louise Owen. Front row left to right: Audrey Bannon, Cecilia Campbell, Betty Witters. Click image for a larger version.

PUYALLUP, Wash. — Eight Washington residents were inducted into the Washington State 4-H Hall of Fame at the 4-H Forum in Chelan Oct. 20.

They were recognized for their commitment and impact on 4-H and their communities; and leadership to 4-H over many years.

Recognized this year were the following:

Audrey Brannon, Woodinville, has been an active 4-H volunteer in Snohomish County for 30 years where her name is synonymous with 4-H poultry. She co-founded the Bear Creek Bunch 4-H Club in 1976. She served as county poultry program leader and later as Evergreen State Fair 4-H Poultry Superintendent. She received the Snohomish County Clover Award in 2005.

Richard Bartram, Wenatchee, a WSU Extension educator in Chelan, Douglas and Okanogan counties from 1947 to 1981 helped establish a 4-H camp on Lost Lake in Okanogan and played a major role in establishing the Chelan County Fair. He, other extension staff and volunteers built some of the buildings at the fairgrounds.

In 1952, Cecelia Campbell, Twisp, started the first 4-H club in Twisp. She served as its leader for 24 years. She and her husband Orvan showed champion registered Hereford cattle. Many 4-H’ers learned fitting, showing and livestock husbandry at the Campbell’s ranch on Beaver Creek. They hosted many 4-H events at their ranch.

Jody Hoffman, Colville, has been a volunteer in the Stevens County 4-H program for 23 years. She currently serves as leader of the Stevens County Dog Program as well as leader of the Panorama 4-Paws 4-H Club. Thanks in large part to her help, five small animal shows and contests are offered in Stevens County each year.

Dave and Louise Owen, Brush Prairie, became 4-H leaders in Clark County more than 24 years ago. They developed a 4-H poultry program that reached beyond the many members of the Prairie Hatchers 4-H Club. With the Owens’ encouragement, club members helped provide poultry project workshops in Washington, Idaho and Montana. Dave Owen, who died in 2002, became the leading poultry volunteer specialist in the state, providing training to other club leaders. He later served on a national 4-H poultry committee which develops new poultry curriculum. Louise still leads the Hatchers and is a member of the Clark County Leaders Association Executive Board.

Jo Simpson, Snohomish, has been a 4-H dog program leader in Snohomish County for 15 years. Her club regularly has more than 60 members. She was co-founder of the Canine Connections program at the Echo Glen Co- educational Juvenile Corrections Facility in 2000. There she guides youth to raise and train abandoned dogs which are then placed for adoption. The dogs get homes; the youth learn useful life skills. The program has been featured on the KING-5 TV’s Evening Magazine.

Betty Witters, Clarkston, has been a 4-H leader in Asotin County for more than 35 years. She has been an organizational leader, clothing and textiles superintendent and a fashion review superintendent. She has volunteered at Demonstration Day many times and has helped organize other 4-H activities during her years as a leader.

More than 140 people have been inducted into the State 4-H Hall of Fame since its inception in 2001.

The Washington State 4-H program is a community of young people who are learning leadership, citizenship and life skills. Adult leaders and volunteers are vital to the success of the program. Youth can participate in such project areas as animal science, Know Your Government Conference, cultural exchanges, Science Camp-In, technology, dramatic arts and photography.

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