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Grays Harbor Places 4 in 4-H Hall of Fame

PULLMAN, Wash. — Four 4-H workers represent Grays Harbor County in the newly created Washington State 4-H Hall of Fame.

Inducted were: Davona Gwin, 121 Walker Road, Hoquiam; Phil Hearnesberger, 664 S. Bank Road, Elma; Joe Johnson, 1089 Aubin Road, Walla Walla, and Jim Kling, 531 Cloquallum Road, Elma.

Gwin has been a 4-H volunteer for 35 years. She was first involved in 4-H as a member with a dairy calf in the 1950s with the Humptulips Valley Hustlers 4-H club. She enrolled as a project leader in that club in 1965, became main club leader in 1968, and held that position until 1984. During that time, her club was the recipient of the “Grays Harbor County 4-H Club Achievement Award” a total of 14 times.

Gwin served several years as the Grays Harbor 4-H camp director at Panhandle Lake and has held every office in the County 4-H Leader’s Council, serving as Treasurer since 1977. Currently she is the head cook for the Grays Harbor 4-H camping program and 4-H general superintendent for the Grays Harbor County Fair.

She has served on the State 4-H Advisory Board, and was its president during the 1980s. She represented our state at the National 4-H Conference. Gwin remains active at the county level as state fair coordinator and project leader in foods and clothing.

Hearnesberger is president of the State 4-H Advisory Board. He has been a board member since 1995. He also manages the Panhandle 4-H Camp in Shelton, has been the llama superintendent at State 4-H Fair since 1997, and is a member of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics Advisory Council representing 4-H.

He is a past member of Cooperative Extension’s National Strategic Directions Team, representing 4-H volunteers from the Western Region. Hearnesberger has served seven years on the Leader’s Council. He works as assistant superintendent at Grays Harbor County Fair, is a member of Panhandle 4-H Association Board, and served as president from 1996-99. He was the driving force behind the development of the llama 4-H project in the state and has been awarded the Volunteer of Excellence Award.

Johnson was a statewide equine and swine specialist for WSU Cooperative Extension. He was largely responsible for establishing the 4-H equine program in Washington, and was well known throughout the state for his horse training clinics. He now lives in Walla Walla.

Kling was the 4-H Youth Agent for Grays Harbor County for over 20 years. He retired in the late 1980s. He developed the middle management roles with Grays Harbor 4-H leaders in the 1970s and 80s. These roles remain a strong leadership model today.

Kling helped develop and coordinate the 4-H Salmon Raising Project. This project taught youth how to care for salmon eggs. Kling also coordinated projects for pheasant raising, growing roses, and a wide variety of other unique projects.

Johnson was a statewide equine and swine specialist for WSU Cooperative Extension. He was largely responsible for establishing the 4-H equine program in Washington, and was well known throughout the state for his horse training clinics.

Induction of the first one hundred people was announced at a State 4-H Forum in Ocean Shores. The hall of fame was created as part of the 4-H centennial celebration.

More than 93,500 Washington youths are enrolled in 4-H programs; over 20,300 are enrolled in 1,733 clubs. Another 73,000 participate in a variety of other 4-H activities, such as the school enrichment program, day camps and overnight camping.

More than 10,300 adult volunteers support 4-H, which is Washington State University Cooperative Extension’s informal, educational program for today’s young people. The program combines the cooperative efforts of youth, volunteer leaders, WSU faculty, federal, state, and local governments, and businesses.

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FOR LOCAL INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL:
(360) 482-2934 for Joan Vance, Area 4-H Agent